Sunday August 28

 


Go 9×9
10:15am to 1:45pm
£10
Swiss pairings over 4 rounds with a 20 minute time control.
The origins of the game are obscure, but Go players frequently refer to their game being 4,000 years old. The game was invented in china, but its spiritual home has long been Japan, where it supports a corps of professional players, teacher and commentators. It is also extremely popular in Korea.
The game starts with an empty board and each player in turn places stone on a vacant point with the object of enclosing territory (Unoccupied points). A secondary aim is to surround and capture the opponent’s stones. The game looks deceptively simple but is as profound as any game ever invented – one slip can result in irretrievable collapse. Expert play, to the tutored eye, has an elegance rarely found in other games.

 


Blokus
10:15am to 1:45pm
£10
Swiss pairings over 3 rounds with 4 players per board.
Blokus (pronounced like “block us”) is an abstract strategy board game for two to four players, invented by Bernard Tavitian. It has won several awards, including the Mensa Select award and the 2004 Teacher’s Choice Award. The game is played on a square board divided into 20 rows and 20 columns, for a total of 400 squares. There are a total of 84 game tiles, organized into 21 shapes in each of four colors: blue, yellow, red, and green. Order of play is based on color, with blue going first, followed by yellow, red, and green. The first piece played of each color is placed in one of the board’s four corners. Each new piece played must be placed so that it touches at least one piece of the same color, with only corner-to-corner contact allowed—edges cannot touch. However, edge-to-edge contact is allowed when two pieces of different colour are involved. When a player cannot place a piece, he or she passes, and play continues as normal. The game ends when no one can place a piece.
When a game ends, the score is based on the number of squares in each player’s unplayed pieces; a player loses one point for each square (e.g. a tetromino is worth -4 points). If a player played all of his or her pieces, he or she gets a bonus score of +20 points if the last piece played was a monomino, +15 points otherwise.


Kenken and Sudoku
10:15am to 1:45pm
£10
Written exam over 3.5 hours with equal points to Sudoku and Kenken solutions.
Sudoku is a logic-based, combinatorial number-placement puzzle. The objective is to fill a 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid (also called “boxes”, “blocks”, “regions”, or “sub-squares”) contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. The puzzle setter provides a partially completed grid, which for a well-posed puzzle has a unique solution.
In Kenken as in sudoku, the goal of each puzzle is to fill a grid with digits –– 1 through 4 for a 4×4 grid, 1 through 5 for a 5×5, etc. –– so that no digit appears more than once in any row or any column (a Latin square). Grids range in size from 3×3 to 9×9. Additionally, KenKen grids are divided into heavily outlined groups of cells –– often called “cages” –– and the numbers in the cells of each cage must produce a certain “target” number when combined using a specified mathematical operation (either addition, subtraction, multiplication or division). Digits may be repeated within a cage, as long as they are not in the same row or column.

 


Go 13×13
2:15pm to 6:00pm
£10
Swiss pairings over 4 rounds with a 20 minute time control.
The origins of the game are obscure, but Go players frequently refer to their game being 4,000 years old. The game was invented in china, but its spiritual home has long been Japan, where it supports a corps of professional players, teacher and commentators. It is also extremely popular in Korea.
The game starts with an empty board and each player in turn places stone on a vacant point with the object of enclosing territory (Unoccupied points). A secondary aim is to surround and capture the opponent’s stones. The game looks deceptively simple but is as profound as any game ever invented – one slip can result in irretrievable collapse. Expert play, to the tutored eye, has an elegance rarely found in other games.

Crossword
*4pm to 6:00pm
£10
A classic challenge to solve of cryptic clues to ‘disguised’ solutions.

 


Bridge Pairs
10.15am to 6pm (lunch break 1.30pm-2.15pm)
£15
The game we now call Bridge is Contract Bridge (the same game as Auction Bridge but with a more sophisticated scoring system). It was developed from Whist via Biritch, Auction Bridge and Plafond. The game dates form 1925 and is generally credited to Harold S Vanderbilt who, together with friends, worked out the rules during some experimental games on a sea journey. Ely Culbertson popularised Contract Bridge in the 1930s and 1940s since when several tournament systems have been devised and refined.
Duplicate Bridge is form of play in which the chance element inherent in social rubber Bridge is eliminated by allowing contestants to play the same hands. Tournaments are commonly organised for Pairs (the same couples play together throughout).

 


Quoridor
2:15pm to 6:00pm
£10
Swiss pairings over 5 rounds with a 15 minute time control.
The abstract strategy game Quoridor is surprisingly deep for its simple rules. Quoridor is a 2 player abstract strategy game designed by Mirko Marchesi and published by Gigamic Games. Quoridor received the Mensa Mind Game award in 1997 and the Game Of The Year in the USA, France, Canada and Belgium. The object of the game is to advance your pawn to the opposite edge of the board. On your turn you may either move your pawn or place a wall. You may hinder your opponent with wall placement, but not completely block him off. Meanwhile, he is trying to do the same to you. The first pawn to reach the opposite side wins.

 


Creative Thinking World Championship
2:15pm to 6:00pm
£10
The Creative Thinking World Championship comprises four written exams of 30 minutes each. Contestants will be set a variety of tasks involving imagination and originality. Points will be scored for: Creative Fecundity – ability to produce a large number of ideas in a limited time; and Pure Originality – the ability to come up with ideas that other people don’t consider. The scoring system will, however, reward quality more highly than quantity.
The fourth round often features diagrams from patent entries with a prompt asking contestants to create a story/explanation as to what device the patent describes (the highest marks are not necessarily given to the person who guesses what the device is really for, but rather for the most imaginative response).


Agricola
10.15am to 6pm (lunch break 1.30pm-2.15pm)
£15 (AM+PM; register for Double Session)
3 rounds of 3-5 players per board.
Agricola is a German-style board game created by Uwe Rosenberg, and published by Lookout Games in Europe and Z-Man Games in the US. The goal of the game is to build the most well-balanced farm at the end of 14 rounds, consisting of plowed fields for crops and fenced pastures for livestock. The farm should have little fallow land and a large farmhouse built of high quality material. The player should also expand the family tending the farm from its initial two members to a maximum of five. The game was released at Spiel 2007, where it was voted second-best game shown at the convention, according to the Fairplay in-show voting.[1] The game was released in English by Z-Man Games in July 2008.

 


Texas Hold’Em
7pm to 10:30pm
£10
Pot-limit Texas Hold’Em.
Texas hold ’em (also known as hold ’em or holdem) is a variation of the standard card game of poker. Texas hold ’em consists of two cards (hole cards) being dealt face down to each player and then five community cards being placed face-up by the dealer—a series of three (“the flop”) then an additional single card (“the turn” or “fourth”) and another additional card (“the river” or “fifth street”)—with players having the option to check, bet, raise or fold after each deal; i.e., betting may occur prior to the flop, “on the flop”, “on the turn”, and “on the river”.

 


Quiz
7pm to 10:30pm
£10
Teams of 2 competitors will compete over a series of trivia questions (you can choose your partner). The questions will be set by Bill Hartston who is also running the Creative Thinking World Championship. This is sure to be a fun event for all! Bill is an expert at combining trivia with humor and recently authored the award winning book, The Things that Nobody Knows.

 

 


Gomoku
7pm to 10:30pm
£10
Opening rule is swap2. 6 rounds with 10 minute time control and a 10 second increment per move.
Gomoku is an abstract strategy board game. Also called Gobang or Five in a Row, it is traditionally played with Go pieces (black and white stones) on a go board with 19×19 intersections; however, because once placed, pieces are not moved or removed from the board; gomoku may also be played as a paper and pencil game. This game is known in several countries under different names. Black plays first, and players alternate in placing a stone of their color on an empty intersection. The winner is the first player to get an unbroken row of five stones horizontally, vertically, or diagonally.

 


Dominion
7pm to 10:30pm
£10
5 Rounds with 20 minutes per player.
Dominion is a deck-building game created by Donald X. Vaccarino. Each player uses a separate deck of cards to which only he or she has access; players draw their hands from their own decks, not others’. During turns, players use their cards to perform various actions and purchase cards from a common pool of card stacks available to all players, including those that give them more actions, coins to purchase cards, and victory cards that are otherwise valueless during the game. At the end of the game, defined when certain common stacks are exhausted, the player with the highest number of victory points wins. The game has a light medieval theme, with card names that reference pre-industrial, monarchical, and feudal social structures.

 


Continuo
7pm to 10:30pm
£10
Swiss pairings over 4 rounds where each player has 25 minutes per game.
A pattern-matching tile game, ideally for two players, Continuo was invented by Maureen Hiron in 1982 and has sold over five million copies in a total of 37 countries. The game consists of 42 cardboard tiles, each tile divided into 16 (4×4) small squares. Each square is of a single colour and a tile may have either two or three different colours (there are only four colours in total – blue, green, yellow and red). Players draw tiles and lay down one in turn such that it abuts at least one tile already on the table. The player scores all squares of a group o the same colour where at least one square on the placed tile is contiguous with at least one square of the tile it abuts. A group of squares may cover several tiles. The winner is the player with the highest score when all tiles have been played.